mldyhre2

The Welcome Pine Point ARG reminds me of the near ‘ghosting’ of New Castle in Australia when the BHP’s Steelworks closed down in 1999. The moving stories from this era would make a terrific ARG/LBG …

Thanks to Magnus for his Case Study… mldyhre2:

Welcome to Pine Point
Transmedia Storytelling

… The context of the story evolve around the extinction of Pine Point, and with this it creates a sense of nostalgia and melancholia for the viewer as they get to know the people who lived in the town and how they eventually return once a year to celebrate the Pine Point Bash. It is quite easy to only click through something like this, but if you actually spend some time going through this story you will really feel like you get to know the town and its former residents.

jacquiwachtel
A thorough investigation into the FutureCoast ARG by jacquiwachtel:

FUTURECOAST ARG - February 2014
FutureCoast is an interactive sci-fi (or cli-fi) that has launched a rich discussion around the issue of climate change via collaborative storytelling. SynopsisWe’re in the future, well into the future, and something has gone wrong with the voicemail system. It’s malfunctioned, and shoots crystalline structures back in time (called Chronofacts) that hold public voicemail recordings from the years between 2020 to 2065.
These Chronofacts are scattered across countries around the world and FutureCoast players are tasked to find them as part of this ARG. 
These conversations often talk about new technologies or environmental events from the future, allowing listeners to fill in the blanks.
Here’s the thing; in reality (outside the narrative), players are actually leaving these voicemails about the future for other players to find as Chronofacts.
The aim of FutureCoast was to create a common ground where information sharing and new ideas have a place to flourish. It’s a powerful project to get us thinking about the future world.

Why is this project important to my creative practice?FutureCoast is important to my creative practice because it demonstrates the power of transmedia storytelling and how it paved a way to get climate change on the public agenda.My MPE will be based around Do-It-Youself (DIY) and environmental sustainability, so this project was a perfect case study to analyse from an environmental aspect, and from a user participation perspective, where collaborative storytelling meant that players dictated the overall outcome which became meaningful to them. That’s the kind of engagement I want with my MPE/ARG.“If you make a game about something that matters, your “players” will want to participate in that larger discussion. If you genuinely make that participation meaningful in the game, it can also be meaningful in real life.”   - Ken Eklund

A thorough investigation into the FutureCoast ARG by jacquiwachtel:

FUTURECOAST ARG - February 2014

FutureCoast is an interactive sci-fi (or cli-fi) that has launched a rich discussion around the issue of climate change via collaborative storytelling.

Synopsis
We’re in the future, well into the future, and something has gone wrong with the voicemail system. It’s malfunctioned, and shoots crystalline structures back in time (called Chronofacts) that hold public voicemail recordings from the years between 2020 to 2065.

  • These Chronofacts are scattered across countries around the world and FutureCoast players are tasked to find them as part of this ARG. 
  • These conversations often talk about new technologies or environmental events from the future, allowing listeners to fill in the blanks.
  • Here’s the thing; in reality (outside the narrative), players are actually leaving these voicemails about the future for other players to find as Chronofacts.
  • The aim of FutureCoast was to create a common ground where information sharing and new ideas have a place to flourish. It’s a powerful project to get us thinking about the future world.

Why is this project important to my creative practice?
FutureCoast is important to my creative practice because it demonstrates the power of transmedia storytelling and how it paved a way to get climate change on the public agenda.

My MPE will be based around Do-It-Youself (DIY) and environmental sustainability, so this project was a perfect case study to analyse from an environmental aspect, and from a user participation perspective, where collaborative storytelling meant that players dictated the overall outcome which became meaningful to them. That’s the kind of engagement I want with my MPE/ARG.

“If you make a game about something that matters, your “players” will want to participate in that larger discussion. If you genuinely make that participation meaningful in the game, it can also be meaningful in real life.”   -
 Ken Eklund

multipleinteractions

An extensive account of the Marble Hornets ARG by multipleinteractions:

image

Synopsis

Marble Hornets (MH) was a YouTube web series and an ARG running from 2009. The game was created by Troy Wagner and Joseph DeLage and was inspired by the Slender Man Myth.

The YouTube channel series tells a story from the viewpoint of a man named Jay. He goes on many creepy and…

jeppeschaumburg

Some good observations, statistics and review information on the Ingress mobile game from jeppeschaumburg:

The Ingress app for Android has been downloaded more than 1 million times, but it is still unclear how many users actually play it. Some sources state that there is at least 500,000 players worldwide.

It is possible to play the game alone, but it encourages people to play together. One reason…

talkinbout402

talkinbout402:

So, all in all, I really have to say that the Catching Fire transmedia campaign truly is an example of impeccable fan understanding and a very creative expansion of an existing storyworld that needs very little new story content because it is able to capitalize on the message of the…

World Without Oil - ARG Case Study

This is one of the Case Studies we discussed briefly in last weeks workshop.

World Without Oil combined elements of an alternate reality game with those of a serious game. The game sketched out the overarching conditions of a realistic oil shock, then called upon players to imagine and document their lives under those conditions. Compelling player stories and ideas were incorporated into the official narrative, posted daily. Players could choose to post their stories as videos, images or blog entries, or to phone or email them to the WWO gamemasters. The game’s central site linked to all the player material, and the game’s characters documented their own lives, and commented on player stories, on a community blog and individual blogs, plus via IM, chat, Twitter and other media… A countdown site appeared approximately 2 weeks before the game start on April 30, 2007. The game concluded 32 days later, on June 1, 2007 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Without_Oil

Although this ARG is a terrific example of a Multi-platform event created with great intentions for a good cause… it could also be argued that it naively overlooks much of the complexities of the issues raised. Is this a case of passive idealism being performed from within the comfortable confines of the very system it deems to problematize and criticize?

In the past we have had radical reactions to social-political issues… even the surrealists ‘used chaos and variety of urban experience to sabotage tradition and order… disrupting meaning, but also recovering it’ (Savage 2000, 42). The participants of WWO, seem far more polite and well meaning, dutifully carrying out instructions from the WWO website, never really subverting, changing or challenging anything. Yes they are being thoughtful, reflective and communicative with each other… but is this really empowering anybody?

I have posted this video here before with more information… when I was clearly more convinced of the socio-political value of this project.

Thanks RJ

An insightful look into the 2006 “LOST” multi-platform experience… by Brisbane based studio, ‘Hoodlum’: http://www.hoodlum.com.au/

The Lost Experience was the first ARG created for the popular TV show LOST. It was launched during the break between Seasons 2 and 3 and was designed to expand the mythology and storyline told in the show. Although the story in the ARG was not part of the main storyline of the show itself, it gave fans various side-stories of many important characters/settings that appeared in the show. This strengthened the mythology established in the show and gave fans a richer, deeper experience of the overall story.

ho-aki
A Japanese perspective!
Thanks Aki! It’s so wonderful to have such an international cohort of Masters students in 2013. We are all learning so much from each other.
ho-aki:

Dear Class, thank you for your sharing your case studies!
Here is my poster: the orange markers are my favorite points (which I felt cool/unique), and the red markers are important or related with my top 6 criteria.
-
Now I have found another important question - “what will be needed to develop Japanese ARG?”
In Japan ARG seems to be around 5 years old thing. Indeed as you may know, Japan already has the big culture of transmedia - manga, anime, video games, cosplay, doujin, maybe kinds of MPE … but may not familiar with “being a real player = shy? / bringing ourselves into the game” in ARG. I guess. Just guess, I need research.
However I am glad to be shared some Japanese topic from classmates today. Japan has the potential! And as I posted before as a link-list, definitely there are people who are planning to make Japanese ARG more active/familiar thing. This is exactly the right opportunity to search and know about Japanese ARG matter. Thanks.
-
And I have regretted not to focus on anime/manga/digital game things at all… It should be interesting to search from my viewpoint: I am a Japanese, and also a doujin artist ( = who loves drawing illustration/manga, composing music, creating games etc and releases our works on/off-line methods. We sometimes have huge events which maybe related with MPE, with interactions between fans - doujin artists (& works) / fans - fans / artists (& works) - artists (& works), but not like gaming/solving mysteries/zombie-happenings/etc.).

A Japanese perspective!

Thanks Aki!
It’s so wonderful to have such an international cohort of Masters students in 2013. We are all learning so much from each other.

ho-aki:

Dear Class, thank you for your sharing your case studies!

Here is my poster: the orange markers are my favorite points (which I felt cool/unique), and the red markers are important or related with my top 6 criteria.

-

Now I have found another important question - “what will be needed to develop Japanese ARG?”

In Japan ARG seems to be around 5 years old thing. Indeed as you may know, Japan already has the big culture of transmedia - manga, anime, video games, cosplay, doujin, maybe kinds of MPE … but may not familiar with “being a real player = shy? / bringing ourselves into the game” in ARG. I guess. Just guess, I need research.

However I am glad to be shared some Japanese topic from classmates today. Japan has the potential! And as I posted before as a link-list, definitely there are people who are planning to make Japanese ARG more active/familiar thing. This is exactly the right opportunity to search and know about Japanese ARG matter. Thanks.

-

And I have regretted not to focus on anime/manga/digital game things at all… It should be interesting to search from my viewpoint: I am a Japanese, and also a doujin artist ( = who loves drawing illustration/manga, composing music, creating games etc and releases our works on/off-line methods. We sometimes have huge events which maybe related with MPE, with interactions between fans - doujin artists (& works) / fans - fans / artists (& works) - artists (& works), but not like gaming/solving mysteries/zombie-happenings/etc.).

designinginteractionslasse
Lasse is a current Masters student at QUT. He is undertaking my class in MPE Design and production.
This is the poster he presented at class yesterday that summarises his case study research. More details can be found on his class tumblr…
designinginteractionslasse:

This is my poster of my case study on Multi Platform Events. 

And more details on Lasse’s ‘6 criteria for successful MPE’ design:

designinginteractionslasse:

These are the 6 criteria for making a great MPE that I have found during my research. Each criteria is based upon specific aspect of current MPEs that I found important, to make a successful MPE. 

1. Influence
Players of the MPE can actually influence the story, and change the events and storyline during the game. This makes you fell that the choices you make actually matter, and makes the interaction with the MPE much more ‘real’. As an example at the end Dexter Hunter/Prey players could vote on who of the two main characters should get killed.

2. Empathy
In the sense that you can relate to the characters in the MPE and fell a connection to them. This makes you emotionally connected with the MPE and therefore more involved in it. In Dexter Hunter/Prey some players had developed empathy for the killer, and therefore made Facebook pages and videos to express grief of him being killed at the end of the game.

3. Impact
Meaning that playing the game makes an impact on peoples lives fx. a social impact. When a MPE actually makes a impact on people lives, it makes people more involved in the game, and can have both long term and short term impacts on their lives. Dexter Hunter/Prey had a big impact during the game, where communities and relationships was created during the MPE.

4. Motivation
The players need to be motivated by the MPE in order to want to proceed with the game, so people need some kind of reason, why they should do this. As an example Zombies Run serves as a motivater for people to run, because they think its more fun.

5. High Engagement
While playing the game it is important that people can engage on different levels. If an MPE is limited in the way that you can engage, the MPE suffers from this. As an example, The Xi MPE by Playstation did not force you to engage socially with other players, which limited the gameplay.

6. Great Use of Tools
In order for an MPE to be successful it is important that you make good use of tools and make appropriate choices of which tools to use. The Art Of The H3ist by Audi really exploited their access to a lot of resources and used a lot of platforms in their MPE. The Mark of Spiderman is another example where Peter Parkers backpack served as physical evidence and an intriguing and important part of the game.

Lasse is a current Masters student at QUT. He is undertaking my class in MPE Design and production.

This is the poster he presented at class yesterday that summarises his case study research. More details can be found on his class tumblr…

designinginteractionslasse:

This is my poster of my case study on Multi Platform Events. 

And more details on Lasse’s ‘6 criteria for successful MPE’ design:

designinginteractionslasse:

These are the 6 criteria for making a great MPE that I have found during my research. Each criteria is based upon specific aspect of current MPEs that I found important, to make a successful MPE.
 

1. Influence

Players of the MPE can actually influence the story, and change the events and storyline during the game. This makes you fell that the choices you make actually matter, and makes the interaction with the MPE much more ‘real’. As an example at the end Dexter Hunter/Prey players could vote on who of the two main characters should get killed.

2. Empathy

In the sense that you can relate to the characters in the MPE and fell a connection to them. This makes you emotionally connected with the MPE and therefore more involved in it. In Dexter Hunter/Prey some players had developed empathy for the killer, and therefore made Facebook pages and videos to express grief of him being killed at the end of the game.

3. Impact

Meaning that playing the game makes an impact on peoples lives fx. a social impact. When a MPE actually makes a impact on people lives, it makes people more involved in the game, and can have both long term and short term impacts on their lives. Dexter Hunter/Prey had a big impact during the game, where communities and relationships was created during the MPE.

4. Motivation

The players need to be motivated by the MPE in order to want to proceed with the game, so people need some kind of reason, why they should do this. As an example Zombies Run serves as a motivater for people to run, because they think its more fun.

5. High Engagement

While playing the game it is important that people can engage on different levels. If an MPE is limited in the way that you can engage, the MPE suffers from this. As an example, The Xi MPE by Playstation did not force you to engage socially with other players, which limited the gameplay.

6. Great Use of Tools

In order for an MPE to be successful it is important that you make good use of tools and make appropriate choices of which tools to use. The Art Of The H3ist by Audi really exploited their access to a lot of resources and used a lot of platforms in their MPE. The Mark of Spiderman is another example where Peter Parkers backpack served as physical evidence and an intriguing and important part of the game.

Fincher’s 1997 film, “The Game”, starring Michael Douglas.

This film has the audience follow a man struggling to differentiate his real life from ‘The Game’. This is the ultimate circumstance for an ARG… that is, when the player is living a blended experience as themselves and as a fictional character… in the real world which has been transformed into a theatre by mere narrative suggestion. However, ‘The Game’ is an extravagant version of an ARG: 

One thing CRS needs is a lot of money. Millions just to run one Game. http://www.herogames.com/forums/showthread.php/60313-The-Game-Consumer-Recreation-Services-%28CRS%29

This also demonstrates the need for complicit agents in such a game… such as friends who agree to help sustain the fantastic story… and a few well formed fake organisations that help to anchor the story in the real world. Although in this film the organisation, CRS, is represented by a large office and staff… it could as easily be presented as a website, email addresses, fake network profiles, fake videos etc.

Fincher won’t let the audience in on anything with this one. The Game achieves a feat by only giving the audience as much information as it gives its main character. And that nearly destroyshim… I walked out of the theater knowing that everything was going to be okay for Van Orton, but still not quite sure that it would be… http://www.filmschoolrejects.com/features/movies-we-love-the-game-colea.php

Review:

‘He watches his life turn into a thriller’ Sept 12 1997

http://www.ew.com/ew/article/0„289361,00.html

Essay:

http://www.criterion.com/films/28058-the-game