Cohort of 2013

Here is a list of your peers for the 2013 MPE project, with a link to their project journals and the skills collected at last weeks session… 

Please email me if you would like any details updated.

Aki - illustration, sound design, web design

James - Script writing, sound design, video editing

RJ - concept development, logic design, ‘Jister’ 

Mo - graphic design

Nicky - project coordination, attention to detial

Justin - graphic design, digital illustration, logic design

Mi Young - motion graphics, video editing

Yuwen - illustration, crafts

Shiang-Chiun - visual design, animation

Lasse - web and app development, working with sensors

Sarah - graphic design, illustration, motion graphics

Morgane - graphic design, advertising strategy, photography

Steph - graphic design, typography, branding

Aurelie - ?

Thanks RJ

An insightful look into the 2006 “LOST” multi-platform experience… by Brisbane based studio, ‘Hoodlum’: http://www.hoodlum.com.au/

The Lost Experience was the first ARG created for the popular TV show LOST. It was launched during the break between Seasons 2 and 3 and was designed to expand the mythology and storyline told in the show. Although the story in the ARG was not part of the main storyline of the show itself, it gave fans various side-stories of many important characters/settings that appeared in the show. This strengthened the mythology established in the show and gave fans a richer, deeper experience of the overall story.

ho-aki
A Japanese perspective!
Thanks Aki! It’s so wonderful to have such an international cohort of Masters students in 2013. We are all learning so much from each other.
ho-aki:

Dear Class, thank you for your sharing your case studies!
Here is my poster: the orange markers are my favorite points (which I felt cool/unique), and the red markers are important or related with my top 6 criteria.
-
Now I have found another important question - “what will be needed to develop Japanese ARG?”
In Japan ARG seems to be around 5 years old thing. Indeed as you may know, Japan already has the big culture of transmedia - manga, anime, video games, cosplay, doujin, maybe kinds of MPE … but may not familiar with “being a real player = shy? / bringing ourselves into the game” in ARG. I guess. Just guess, I need research.
However I am glad to be shared some Japanese topic from classmates today. Japan has the potential! And as I posted before as a link-list, definitely there are people who are planning to make Japanese ARG more active/familiar thing. This is exactly the right opportunity to search and know about Japanese ARG matter. Thanks.
-
And I have regretted not to focus on anime/manga/digital game things at all… It should be interesting to search from my viewpoint: I am a Japanese, and also a doujin artist ( = who loves drawing illustration/manga, composing music, creating games etc and releases our works on/off-line methods. We sometimes have huge events which maybe related with MPE, with interactions between fans - doujin artists (& works) / fans - fans / artists (& works) - artists (& works), but not like gaming/solving mysteries/zombie-happenings/etc.).

A Japanese perspective!

Thanks Aki!
It’s so wonderful to have such an international cohort of Masters students in 2013. We are all learning so much from each other.

ho-aki:

Dear Class, thank you for your sharing your case studies!

Here is my poster: the orange markers are my favorite points (which I felt cool/unique), and the red markers are important or related with my top 6 criteria.

-

Now I have found another important question - “what will be needed to develop Japanese ARG?”

In Japan ARG seems to be around 5 years old thing. Indeed as you may know, Japan already has the big culture of transmedia - manga, anime, video games, cosplay, doujin, maybe kinds of MPE … but may not familiar with “being a real player = shy? / bringing ourselves into the game” in ARG. I guess. Just guess, I need research.

However I am glad to be shared some Japanese topic from classmates today. Japan has the potential! And as I posted before as a link-list, definitely there are people who are planning to make Japanese ARG more active/familiar thing. This is exactly the right opportunity to search and know about Japanese ARG matter. Thanks.

-

And I have regretted not to focus on anime/manga/digital game things at all… It should be interesting to search from my viewpoint: I am a Japanese, and also a doujin artist ( = who loves drawing illustration/manga, composing music, creating games etc and releases our works on/off-line methods. We sometimes have huge events which maybe related with MPE, with interactions between fans - doujin artists (& works) / fans - fans / artists (& works) - artists (& works), but not like gaming/solving mysteries/zombie-happenings/etc.).

designinginteractionslasse
Lasse is a current Masters student at QUT. He is undertaking my class in MPE Design and production.
This is the poster he presented at class yesterday that summarises his case study research. More details can be found on his class tumblr…
designinginteractionslasse:

This is my poster of my case study on Multi Platform Events. 

And more details on Lasse’s ‘6 criteria for successful MPE’ design:

designinginteractionslasse:

These are the 6 criteria for making a great MPE that I have found during my research. Each criteria is based upon specific aspect of current MPEs that I found important, to make a successful MPE. 

1. Influence
Players of the MPE can actually influence the story, and change the events and storyline during the game. This makes you fell that the choices you make actually matter, and makes the interaction with the MPE much more ‘real’. As an example at the end Dexter Hunter/Prey players could vote on who of the two main characters should get killed.

2. Empathy
In the sense that you can relate to the characters in the MPE and fell a connection to them. This makes you emotionally connected with the MPE and therefore more involved in it. In Dexter Hunter/Prey some players had developed empathy for the killer, and therefore made Facebook pages and videos to express grief of him being killed at the end of the game.

3. Impact
Meaning that playing the game makes an impact on peoples lives fx. a social impact. When a MPE actually makes a impact on people lives, it makes people more involved in the game, and can have both long term and short term impacts on their lives. Dexter Hunter/Prey had a big impact during the game, where communities and relationships was created during the MPE.

4. Motivation
The players need to be motivated by the MPE in order to want to proceed with the game, so people need some kind of reason, why they should do this. As an example Zombies Run serves as a motivater for people to run, because they think its more fun.

5. High Engagement
While playing the game it is important that people can engage on different levels. If an MPE is limited in the way that you can engage, the MPE suffers from this. As an example, The Xi MPE by Playstation did not force you to engage socially with other players, which limited the gameplay.

6. Great Use of Tools
In order for an MPE to be successful it is important that you make good use of tools and make appropriate choices of which tools to use. The Art Of The H3ist by Audi really exploited their access to a lot of resources and used a lot of platforms in their MPE. The Mark of Spiderman is another example where Peter Parkers backpack served as physical evidence and an intriguing and important part of the game.

Lasse is a current Masters student at QUT. He is undertaking my class in MPE Design and production.

This is the poster he presented at class yesterday that summarises his case study research. More details can be found on his class tumblr…

designinginteractionslasse:

This is my poster of my case study on Multi Platform Events. 

And more details on Lasse’s ‘6 criteria for successful MPE’ design:

designinginteractionslasse:

These are the 6 criteria for making a great MPE that I have found during my research. Each criteria is based upon specific aspect of current MPEs that I found important, to make a successful MPE.
 

1. Influence

Players of the MPE can actually influence the story, and change the events and storyline during the game. This makes you fell that the choices you make actually matter, and makes the interaction with the MPE much more ‘real’. As an example at the end Dexter Hunter/Prey players could vote on who of the two main characters should get killed.

2. Empathy

In the sense that you can relate to the characters in the MPE and fell a connection to them. This makes you emotionally connected with the MPE and therefore more involved in it. In Dexter Hunter/Prey some players had developed empathy for the killer, and therefore made Facebook pages and videos to express grief of him being killed at the end of the game.

3. Impact

Meaning that playing the game makes an impact on peoples lives fx. a social impact. When a MPE actually makes a impact on people lives, it makes people more involved in the game, and can have both long term and short term impacts on their lives. Dexter Hunter/Prey had a big impact during the game, where communities and relationships was created during the MPE.

4. Motivation

The players need to be motivated by the MPE in order to want to proceed with the game, so people need some kind of reason, why they should do this. As an example Zombies Run serves as a motivater for people to run, because they think its more fun.

5. High Engagement

While playing the game it is important that people can engage on different levels. If an MPE is limited in the way that you can engage, the MPE suffers from this. As an example, The Xi MPE by Playstation did not force you to engage socially with other players, which limited the gameplay.

6. Great Use of Tools

In order for an MPE to be successful it is important that you make good use of tools and make appropriate choices of which tools to use. The Art Of The H3ist by Audi really exploited their access to a lot of resources and used a lot of platforms in their MPE. The Mark of Spiderman is another example where Peter Parkers backpack served as physical evidence and an intriguing and important part of the game.

meyoungnana

The Witness - The first movie in the outernet

13th street Universal

The Challenge : Get the audience engage in genre of thriller and crime.

The solution :  The audience is witness.

When you gathering the clue from the web site, you are able to go to a real crime scene and get the other evidence.  Also you can see the story which have next clue…when you have completed mission, you are able to save her from the mafia.

Thanks posting the video Mi Young… but try to write a more detailed account of the work using the terms and techniques discussed in class. We want to know more about this great project you have found! 

'The Witness' feels like a huge step toward the future I have imagined… which is a seamless blending of our real and fictitious lives… reminiscent of the film we discussed in week 1: The Game with Michael Douglas.

Here is an earlier post I did on Fincher’s film, ‘The Game’… it provides an interesting comparison for ARG’s that have strong ties to cinematic experiences… we’ve been refering to them as 'Broadcast-based' MPEs… or ‘transmedia' projects.

The Xi ARG

It told the story of a woman named Jess and her struggle to protect her mysterious secret project, Xi. Jess would go missing in the game and players were tasked to piece together clues and information from a variety of puzzles and mini-games to progress in the story and find her… In an interview for Edge magazine, creator Patrick O’Luanaigh said that nDreams “ended up doing 12 spaces, 24 mini-games, 108 videos, and four huge websites” in creating Xi. (http://www.edge-online.com/features/home-games/) Posted by RJMISO

Sample interfaces from the Dexter- Hunter Prey ARG

These web interfaces demonstrate some of the design/narrative concepts we discussed in class this week… especially regarding the creation of fake websites for characters and organisations… blending the fictitious with the very real world… and connecting NPCs with PCs across game world dimensions!

Art and Direction by Matt St. Gelais:

The two characters engaged players across two main sites (sleepsuperbly.com and serialhuntress.com), as well as countless microsites, social media profiles, mobile components, and real-world locations. The outcome of the game was actually determined by player participation, and elements from the ARG appeared in the new season of DEXTER. http://work.mattsaintg.com/

Images above:

Thanks to Lasse Iverson for introducing this project to the class. 

The game world moves between the fictional world of Dexter and the real world, and therefore blurs the line between whats reality and fiction, which is one of the main characteristics in a ARG…

After the killing of the murderer, some people found themselves grieving this decision, and in-memoriam Facebook groups and videos where created. This is a great tribute to the ARG as really having a impact on peoples lives.